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Burn Out Wisely and Re-prioritize (i.e. Music Releases, Press, and Live Shows)
Written by:
Millaze

20181105, 126pm Starbucks, Maniac soundtrack this is goodbye for us.

millaze tiger dreamhop alt pop
The 4th week, the 4th single, Tiger - out Friday.

This week's release is Tiger - which is about biting into the culture around you (whether you like it or not, it's subconscious) and observing how it works its way through you. We bring our own worst nightmares to life because we fear them -- in the video Millaze sinks into the nightlife of Oakland, in the party streets below the mountains.

This is very linked to today's topic: American culture influencing all of us to go too hard and burn out.

--


I'm drinking my really hot americano, looking out the window at some really pretty trees, and thinking really hard about why my jaw is really, really tight today. I have a hunch I'm on the edge of something that I've experienced many times -- and it's a common experience, particularly for indie musicians: the burn out.


There are so many activities involved in making music a career, and when we get a little bit of hope or energy we’ll feel like we can accomplish them all -- so we pour in. I love when I get a burst of that drive. It's exhilarating. In that trademark American spirit, here in our culture of work masochism, we take that energy and go full-throttle and spend a few hours or days or weeks diving into books and articles and seminars.

But then something happens.

Our brains burn out.


And then our minds burn out.


Which means our hearts burn out.


Which means we get too exhausted to work.


Which is what we need to do to get closer to our career dream.


Burning out is something we all gotta work with -- not against -- because it’s inevitable.


Burn out takes a lot of forms --I bet some people get antsy/grumpy/cynical, some suppress/deny the situation, and for some it’s a sadder, slow flow. And maybe more sleeping. I lean towards that one. I personally don’t suffer anger, but I can get foggy and slow and sad and kinda just mentally peace out.


I know my personal burn out symptoms -- and I’m actually pretty skilled now at recognizing when it’s on its way, too.


I've talked about burn out in my Instagram because I think recognizing when it’s coming is one of the wisest, most powerful skills we can harness. Burn out is a heavy black drape over our brains, and it’s blindsiding - and, gosh, it’s almost revered in our culture. We brag about how busy we are, how tired we are. I’ve done it so many times, too. It’s pretty American, isn’t it.


But you can’t run a business (run a music career) on burn out.

Too busy. Too tired. Exhausted. Drained. No energy to create and move forward. We need sustainable energy to run a business (have a music career). That’s why recognizing you’re burning out is important -- it indicates your brain and body aren’t on a sustainable course. You’re ramming your vehicle up against the same concrete wall over and over and over again.


We all do recognize that’s what a music career is, right? It’s running a business. Imagine: you’re your own product (music and brand and person), marketing and selling yourself, tracking your business accounting and legal whatevers, and on top of it all, being a normal functioning human being living a life. That’s a freaking tall order to ask of anyone -- and yet we musicians pursue it. We also get disappointed by it because few people out there are training us on how to run this entrepreneur marathon.


But I don’t get disappointed by it anymore, because I’ve worked really hard to notice the pattern -- and I know when I need to pivot my strategy before I burn.


So that’s what I’m doing this morning, pivoting my music strategy to prioritize some activities -- and make a deal with myself that I'll simply plan to get to other ones after I hit some milestones with.

So, here’s what I do.

See, in my IMBM research, I cover the landscape of the entire music industry in a pyramid-like visual, to get a bird’s-eye/big-picture view, so you can then choose your strategies to get to your personal “definition of success”. Those strategies can include tens or hundreds of individual activities (you should see me make the MIC Process Manuals for stuff like Music Releases -- it’s crazy detailed), and we feel pressure to do them all. Soon. And well.


But I take my strategy plan and line up my assets to it. I’m talking time, energy, money -- and heck, teampower. Sometimes life is an either-or (thanks, dad!) and we’ll need to push off pieces of our strategy till we have more time, or more energy, or more money later on -- or until we can maybe sign a deal to an indie label or management company and then their teampower can help us out.

Right now I’m driving most of the fire over here (more on my plan for that later, sprinkle in a few winks here cuz it’s a master).

So I’m sitting here today thinking about how, at this moment, for the next few weeks, these are my top 3 priorities - because achieving their metric goals lead me to the next level.


(1) The Dialectic Series getting fully recorded and released (I work on finishing the writing of the 5 albums almost every day, but I admit I sometimes stall on the recording a little because I'd rather the rush of my coffee shop mental 5ks on the business side)

(2) PR and Press, because I have so many adjacent angles with Oakland to tell than just pitching for music reviews (adjacencies galore! one of the indie secrets!),

(3) Live performances - I’ve been itching to get to it but it's so time-consuming and I'm not naturally a night person so it's its own game I gotta train a little more for.


Human as I am, I’ve gotten pulled back into other categories (namely, Sync and Online Presence and Lifestyle Adjacencies) a little too much lately, when I know full well that those are more applicable to pursue after a hit a few milestones with the 3 priorities first. This is all very obvious to my business brain -- but I admit my mind/heart’s pulling a tad, because it wants to be unrealistic and pretend I can do more than I’m capable of. Maybe deep down it’s scared I won’t get to those activities in time, and it’s creating a false sense of pressure that no one’s putting on me except for me. Weird though, because I don’t think I’m consciously putting pressure on myself, where’s it coming from?


Or maybe I’m just tired and on burn out and any feelings of doubt are all an illusion.

I definitely think it's that one.

i didn't have any more pictures for this article -- so here's the pie i made when i was beating off my burnout. dude, it's whole wheat crust, organic coconut milk, and local indiana maple syrup -- I'm a boss at making recipes healthier and therefore more quality and bamf. please ignore the mess i made okay.

I reflect often on how the subconscious takes time to catch up to the conscious -- I consciously know better, but underneath, my subconscious pulls and flicks around. Training yourself on the conscious end to see the world in a way you want to see it is only step #1 -- then you gotta let time do its magic so that subconscious can retrain its neuropathways and synapses (do not test me on the vocab here I'm not a science teacher I'm just speaking to what I've been taught) and catch up to the conscious. That’s why people talk about how it takes however many days to change a habit -- and it’s why New Years resolutions sometimes (ummaybealways) fall off. It’s not cuz any of us are dumb or lazy. Willpower is just one piece of it, that’s all. Patience and grit and having the hope to hold on for the longterm so the subconscious can pick up? That’s the real game.


Anyway, so I shifted from my computer journal over here to my Google Docs Sanctuary notebook to write this one today, because I’m working with a lot of musicians lately who are burning out. We all deal with it, especially us Americans, (I want to drive that point home again -- I could even go on for a while how our culture of stress and overworking harms our health in so many other ways... I'm in it, too, man.)


And I thought sharing this behind-the-scenes of how I dealt with burn out today might take some of the edges off for some indies who need to know they’re not alone. You don’t have to do all the activities. It’s unrealistic asset allocation anyway -- and even more importantly, in business and in life, less is more.


You don’t need to do all of the business activities possible out there -- just do the ones that make the most sense with your strategies, and do them really, really well.


Less is more.


We’ll get into more about less is more later on. Simplicity. KISS: Keep It Simple Stupid. My dad taught me that one too when I founded MIC and became an entrepreneur like him. Such good advice. and I really believe it’s one of the secrets to an indie music career, I truly believe, because it’s also subtly linked to hope and self-fulfilling prophecy and therefore creation of art and a life.

cya next week

millaze

Help a girl out! Youtube and Email Subscribe for exclusive weekly song releases before anyone else gets them, straight from Millaze.

Follow Millaze anywhere you listen to music: Spotify, Apple Music, Youtube, Amazon, etc.

Talk with her on Social Media @iammillaze: Instagram, Twitter, Facebook

Burn Out Wisely and Re-prioritize (i.e. Music Releases, Press, and Live Shows)
Burn Out Wisely and Re-prioritize (i.e. Music Releases, Press, and Live Shows)
My youth of dreaming to be an indie musician, and not knowing where the heck to start, fueled the creation of MIC to help others like me.

20181105, 126pm Starbucks, Maniac soundtrack this is goodbye for us.

millaze tiger dreamhop alt pop
The 4th week, the 4th single, Tiger - out Friday.

This week's release is Tiger - which is about biting into the culture around you (whether you like it or not, it's subconscious) and observing how it works its way through you. We bring our own worst nightmares to life because we fear them -- in the video Millaze sinks into the nightlife of Oakland, in the party streets below the mountains.

This is very linked to today's topic: American culture influencing all of us to go too hard and burn out.

--


I'm drinking my really hot americano, looking out the window at some really pretty trees, and thinking really hard about why my jaw is really, really tight today. I have a hunch I'm on the edge of something that I've experienced many times -- and it's a common experience, particularly for indie musicians: the burn out.


There are so many activities involved in making music a career, and when we get a little bit of hope or energy we’ll feel like we can accomplish them all -- so we pour in. I love when I get a burst of that drive. It's exhilarating. In that trademark American spirit, here in our culture of work masochism, we take that energy and go full-throttle and spend a few hours or days or weeks diving into books and articles and seminars.

But then something happens.

Our brains burn out.


And then our minds burn out.


Which means our hearts burn out.


Which means we get too exhausted to work.


Which is what we need to do to get closer to our career dream.


Burning out is something we all gotta work with -- not against -- because it’s inevitable.


Burn out takes a lot of forms --I bet some people get antsy/grumpy/cynical, some suppress/deny the situation, and for some it’s a sadder, slow flow. And maybe more sleeping. I lean towards that one. I personally don’t suffer anger, but I can get foggy and slow and sad and kinda just mentally peace out.


I know my personal burn out symptoms -- and I’m actually pretty skilled now at recognizing when it’s on its way, too.


I've talked about burn out in my Instagram because I think recognizing when it’s coming is one of the wisest, most powerful skills we can harness. Burn out is a heavy black drape over our brains, and it’s blindsiding - and, gosh, it’s almost revered in our culture. We brag about how busy we are, how tired we are. I’ve done it so many times, too. It’s pretty American, isn’t it.


But you can’t run a business (run a music career) on burn out.

Too busy. Too tired. Exhausted. Drained. No energy to create and move forward. We need sustainable energy to run a business (have a music career). That’s why recognizing you’re burning out is important -- it indicates your brain and body aren’t on a sustainable course. You’re ramming your vehicle up against the same concrete wall over and over and over again.


We all do recognize that’s what a music career is, right? It’s running a business. Imagine: you’re your own product (music and brand and person), marketing and selling yourself, tracking your business accounting and legal whatevers, and on top of it all, being a normal functioning human being living a life. That’s a freaking tall order to ask of anyone -- and yet we musicians pursue it. We also get disappointed by it because few people out there are training us on how to run this entrepreneur marathon.


But I don’t get disappointed by it anymore, because I’ve worked really hard to notice the pattern -- and I know when I need to pivot my strategy before I burn.


So that’s what I’m doing this morning, pivoting my music strategy to prioritize some activities -- and make a deal with myself that I'll simply plan to get to other ones after I hit some milestones with.

So, here’s what I do.

See, in my IMBM research, I cover the landscape of the entire music industry in a pyramid-like visual, to get a bird’s-eye/big-picture view, so you can then choose your strategies to get to your personal “definition of success”. Those strategies can include tens or hundreds of individual activities (you should see me make the MIC Process Manuals for stuff like Music Releases -- it’s crazy detailed), and we feel pressure to do them all. Soon. And well.


But I take my strategy plan and line up my assets to it. I’m talking time, energy, money -- and heck, teampower. Sometimes life is an either-or (thanks, dad!) and we’ll need to push off pieces of our strategy till we have more time, or more energy, or more money later on -- or until we can maybe sign a deal to an indie label or management company and then their teampower can help us out.

Right now I’m driving most of the fire over here (more on my plan for that later, sprinkle in a few winks here cuz it’s a master).

So I’m sitting here today thinking about how, at this moment, for the next few weeks, these are my top 3 priorities - because achieving their metric goals lead me to the next level.


(1) The Dialectic Series getting fully recorded and released (I work on finishing the writing of the 5 albums almost every day, but I admit I sometimes stall on the recording a little because I'd rather the rush of my coffee shop mental 5ks on the business side)

(2) PR and Press, because I have so many adjacent angles with Oakland to tell than just pitching for music reviews (adjacencies galore! one of the indie secrets!),

(3) Live performances - I’ve been itching to get to it but it's so time-consuming and I'm not naturally a night person so it's its own game I gotta train a little more for.


Human as I am, I’ve gotten pulled back into other categories (namely, Sync and Online Presence and Lifestyle Adjacencies) a little too much lately, when I know full well that those are more applicable to pursue after a hit a few milestones with the 3 priorities first. This is all very obvious to my business brain -- but I admit my mind/heart’s pulling a tad, because it wants to be unrealistic and pretend I can do more than I’m capable of. Maybe deep down it’s scared I won’t get to those activities in time, and it’s creating a false sense of pressure that no one’s putting on me except for me. Weird though, because I don’t think I’m consciously putting pressure on myself, where’s it coming from?


Or maybe I’m just tired and on burn out and any feelings of doubt are all an illusion.

I definitely think it's that one.

i didn't have any more pictures for this article -- so here's the pie i made when i was beating off my burnout. dude, it's whole wheat crust, organic coconut milk, and local indiana maple syrup -- I'm a boss at making recipes healthier and therefore more quality and bamf. please ignore the mess i made okay.

I reflect often on how the subconscious takes time to catch up to the conscious -- I consciously know better, but underneath, my subconscious pulls and flicks around. Training yourself on the conscious end to see the world in a way you want to see it is only step #1 -- then you gotta let time do its magic so that subconscious can retrain its neuropathways and synapses (do not test me on the vocab here I'm not a science teacher I'm just speaking to what I've been taught) and catch up to the conscious. That’s why people talk about how it takes however many days to change a habit -- and it’s why New Years resolutions sometimes (ummaybealways) fall off. It’s not cuz any of us are dumb or lazy. Willpower is just one piece of it, that’s all. Patience and grit and having the hope to hold on for the longterm so the subconscious can pick up? That’s the real game.


Anyway, so I shifted from my computer journal over here to my Google Docs Sanctuary notebook to write this one today, because I’m working with a lot of musicians lately who are burning out. We all deal with it, especially us Americans, (I want to drive that point home again -- I could even go on for a while how our culture of stress and overworking harms our health in so many other ways... I'm in it, too, man.)


And I thought sharing this behind-the-scenes of how I dealt with burn out today might take some of the edges off for some indies who need to know they’re not alone. You don’t have to do all the activities. It’s unrealistic asset allocation anyway -- and even more importantly, in business and in life, less is more.


You don’t need to do all of the business activities possible out there -- just do the ones that make the most sense with your strategies, and do them really, really well.


Less is more.


We’ll get into more about less is more later on. Simplicity. KISS: Keep It Simple Stupid. My dad taught me that one too when I founded MIC and became an entrepreneur like him. Such good advice. and I really believe it’s one of the secrets to an indie music career, I truly believe, because it’s also subtly linked to hope and self-fulfilling prophecy and therefore creation of art and a life.

cya next week

millaze

Help a girl out! Youtube and Email Subscribe for exclusive weekly song releases before anyone else gets them, straight from Millaze.

Follow Millaze anywhere you listen to music: Spotify, Apple Music, Youtube, Amazon, etc.

Talk with her on Social Media @iammillaze: Instagram, Twitter, Facebook

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